An Edible History of Humanity

An Edible History of Humanity Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 9781782391654
Year 2012-12-06
Pages 300
Language en
Publisher Atlantic Books Ltd
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Throughout history, food has done more than simply provide sustenance. It has acted as a tool of social transformation, political organization, geopolitical competition, industrial development, military conflict and economic expansion. In An Edible History of Humanity Tom Standage serves up a hugely satisfying account of ways in which food has, indirectly, helped to shape and transform societies around the world. It is a dazzling account of gastronomic revolutions from pre-history to the present.

An Edible History of Humanity

An Edible History of Humanity Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 9780802719829
Year 2009-07-01
Pages 288
Language en
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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Throughout history, food has done more than simply provide sustenance. It has acted as a tool of social transformation, political organization, geopolitical competition, industrial development, military conflict and economic expansion. An Edible History of Humanity is an account of how food has helped to shape and transform societies around the world, from the emergence of farming in China by 7,500 BCE to today's use of sugar cane and corn to make ethanol. Food has been a kind of technology, a tool that has changed the course of human progress. It helped to found, structure, and connect together civilizations worldwide, and to build empires and bring about a surge in economic development through industrialization. Food has been employed as a military and ideological weapon. And today, in the culmination of a process that has been going on for thousands of years, the foods we choose in the supermarket connect us to global debates about trade, development and the adoption of new technologies. Drawing from many fields including genetics, archaeology, anthropology, ethno-botany and economics, the story of these food-driven transformations is a fully satisfying account of the whole of human history.

An Edible History of Humanity

An Edible History of Humanity Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 UOM:39015080861167
Year 2009-05-01
Pages 269
Language en
Publisher
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The first civilizations were built on staple crops - barley and wheat in the Near East, miller and rice in Asia, corn and potatoes in the Americas. The adoption of farming opened the way to new, settled lifestyles, but it also replaced the egalitarian societies of hunter-gathers with strictly ordered social hierarchies. The complex cultures that emerged around the world were then interconnected by trade, particularly the trade in exotic spices. When European countries established direct access to the markets of the Indian Ocean, the age of exploration dawned; after explorers sailed west as well as east, the colonization of the New World began.

A History of the World in 6 Glasses

A History of the World in 6 Glasses Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 0802718590
Year 2009-05-26
Pages 336
Language en
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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From beer to Coca-Cola, the six drinks that have helped shape human history. Throughout human history. certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period. A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Beer was first made in the Fertile Crescent and by 3000 B.C.E. was so important to Mesopotamia and Egypt that it was used to pay wages. In ancient Greece wine became the main export of her vast seaborne trade, helping spread Greek culture abroad. Spirits such as brandy and rum fueled the Age of Exploration, fortifying seamen on long voyages and oiling the pernicious slave trade. Although coffee originated in the Arab world, it stoked revolutionary thought in Europe during the Age of Reason, when coffeehouses became centers of intellectual exchange. And hundreds of years after the Chinese began drinking tea, it became especially popular in Britain, with far-reaching effects on British foreign policy. Finally, though carbonated drinks were invented in 18th-century Europe they became a 20th-century phenomenon, and Coca-Cola in particular is the leading symbol of globalization. For Tom Standage, each drink is a kind of technology, a catalyst for advancing culture by which he demonstrates the intricate interplay of different civilizations. You may never look at your favorite drink the same way again.

Writing on the Wall

Writing on the Wall Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 9781408842072
Year 2013-10-10
Pages 288
Language en
Publisher A&C Black
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Today we are endlessly connected: constantly tweeting, texting or e-mailing. This may seem unprecedented, yet it is not. Throughout history, information has been spread through social networks, with far-reaching social and political effects. Writing on the Wall reveals how an elaborate network of letter exchanges forewarned of power shifts in Cicero's Rome, while the torrent of tracts circulating in sixteenth-century Germany triggered the Reformation. Standage traces the story of the rise, fall and rebirth of social media over the past 2,000 years offering an illuminating perspective on the history of media, and revealing that social networks do not merely connect us today ? they also link us to the past.

The Victorian Internet

The Victorian Internet Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 9781620405925
Year 2014-02-25
Pages 256
Language en
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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A new paperback edition of the first book by the bestselling author of A History of the World in 6 Glasses-the fascinating story of the telegraph, the world's first "Internet," which revolutionized the nineteenth century even more than the Internet has the twentieth and twenty first.

The Neptune File

The Neptune File Author Tom Standage
ISBN-10 0140294643
Year 2001
Pages 240
Language en
Publisher
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The Neptune File tells the story of the gifted mathematician John Couch Adams and the discovery of the planet Neptune in 1846. Combining scientific triumph with international controversy, this is an intriguing tale of the search for an unseen planet, and the uproar it caused. More than just an intriguing historical yarn, Adam's work signified the beginning of a new era of planet hunting by providing astronomers with a powerful tool with which to search for new worlds. It marked the genesis of the idea that astronomers could find new planets by looking for their telltale gravitational influence on other bodies, rather than observing them directly with telescopes. In recent years this approach has led to an extraordinary series of discoveries - today's planet detectives are relying on a technique whose theoretical foundations were laid by their 19th-century predecessors.

Last Call

Last Call Author Daniel Okrent
ISBN-10 1439171696
Year 2010-05-11
Pages 480
Language en
Publisher Simon and Schuster
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A brilliant, authoritative, and fascinating history of America’s most puzzling era, the years 1920 to 1933, when the U.S. Constitution was amended to restrict one of America’s favorite pastimes: drinking alcoholic beverages. From its start, America has been awash in drink. The sailing vessel that brought John Winthrop to the shores of the New World in 1630 carried more beer than water. By the 1820s, liquor flowed so plentifully it was cheaper than tea. That Americans would ever agree to relinquish their booze was as improbable as it was astonishing. Yet we did, and Last Call is Daniel Okrent’s dazzling explanation of why we did it, what life under Prohibition was like, and how such an unprecedented degree of government interference in the private lives of Americans changed the country forever. Writing with both wit and historical acuity, Okrent reveals how Prohibition marked a confluence of diverse forces: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town, native-stock Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants of the large cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other unlikely factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax. Through it all, Americans kept drinking, going to remarkably creative lengths to smuggle, sell, conceal, and convivially (and sometimes fatally) imbibe their favorite intoxicants. Last Call is peopled with vivid characters of an astonishing variety: Susan B. Anthony and Billy Sunday, William Jennings Bryan and bootlegger Sam Bronfman, Pierre S. du Pont and H. L. Mencken, Meyer Lansky and the incredible—if long-forgotten—federal official Mabel Walker Willebrandt, who throughout the twenties was the most powerful woman in the country. (Perhaps most surprising of all is Okrent’s account of Joseph P. Kennedy’s legendary, and long-misunderstood, role in the liquor business.) It’s a book rich with stories from nearly all parts of the country. Okrent’s narrative runs through smoky Manhattan speakeasies, where relations between the sexes were changed forever; California vineyards busily producing “sacramental” wine; New England fishing communities that gave up fishing for the more lucrative rum-running business; and in Washington, the halls of Congress itself, where politicians who had voted for Prohibition drank openly and without apology. Last Call is capacious, meticulous, and thrillingly told. It stands as the most complete history of Prohibition ever written and confirms Daniel Okrent’s rank as a major American writer.

The History of the World

The History of the World Author Frank Welsh
ISBN-10 9781782061106
Year 2013-03-28
Pages 240
Language en
Publisher Hachette UK
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In a narrative beginning almost 1.5 million years ago with the emergence of Homo erectus, Frank Welsh takes the reader from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment, from the Industrial Revolution to the age of terrorism. Using his masterly storytelling skills, he recounts the epic story of human growth, survival and achievement across all continents and ages. Providing insight into the lives of ordinary people in every corner of the globe, this comprehensive book is the perfect introduction to the human history of our planet.

Near a Thousand Tables

Near a Thousand Tables Author Felipe Fernandez-Armesto
ISBN-10 9780743234153
Year 2002-06-04
Pages 272
Language en
Publisher Simon and Schuster
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In Near a Thousand Tables, acclaimed food historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells the fascinating story of food as cultural as well as culinary history -- a window on the history of mankind. In this "appetizingly provocative" (Los Angeles Times) book, he guides readers through the eight great revolutions in the world history of food: the origins of cooking, which set humankind on a course apart from other species; the ritualization of eating, which brought magic and meaning into people's relationship with what they ate; the inception of herding and the invention of agriculture, perhaps the two greatest revolutions of all; the rise of inequality, which led to the development of haute cuisine; the long-range trade in food which, practically alone, broke down cultural barriers; the ecological exchanges, which revolutionized the global distribution of plants and livestock; and, finally, the industrialization and globalization of mass-produced food. From prehistoric snail "herding" to Roman banquets to Big Macs to genetically modified tomatoes, Near a Thousand Tables is a full-course meal of extraordinary narrative, brilliant insight, and fascinating explorations that will satisfy the hungriest of readers.

Food in History

Food in History Author Reay Tannahill
ISBN-10 0140469214
Year 1988
Pages 424
Language en
Publisher
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Spanning over half a million years, this lively account describes the world history of food and the way in which food has influenced the whole course of human development. Full of intriguing information and insights, it reveals how pepper contributed to the fall of the Roman empire; how a new kind of plough helped to spark off the Crusades; why the cow became sacred in India; why stir-fry cooking was invented; how the turkey got its name. This book confirms that food is still, as it always has been, not only inseperable from the history of the human race but essential to it.

Gnostic Anthropology

Gnostic Anthropology Author Samael Aun Weor
ISBN-10 194335801X
Year 2016-10-01
Pages 350
Language en
Publisher
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For centuries, science and religion have been locked in battle, divided by opposing beliefs, and eager to destroy one another. Perhaps their most intense conflict has been over the most fundamental question: the origin of mankind.All of us want to know: who are we? Who were our ancestors? What were ancient civilizations really like? Was Atlantis real? Lemuria? Adam and Eve? Did we really evolve from apes?Sadly, neither science nor religion has provided a satisfactory explanation of the facts; instead, their beliefs and theories are filled with inconsistencies and contradictions. Yet, what if both were right in some ways, and -- with an open mind and more profound knowledge -- one could see the truths that science and religion have described from their own perspectives?Fortunately, the ancient esoteric traditions have preserved the essential knowledge of history, evolution, and nature that answers our most fundamental questions, and help us unite science and religion in a practical way. In 1888, H.P. Blavatsky published her landmark book The Secret Doctrine, an incredibly sophisticated outline of human origins and history that even Albert Einstein kept on his desk. Yet, few were willing to read it, and even fewer were capable of understanding it. Sixty years later, Samael Aun Weor expanded on what she started, most notably in Gnostic Anthropology. He showed that we can only hope to understand reality when science and religion work together in harmony, and we free ourselves of rigid, limiting beliefs and theories, and be willing to consider the facts from fresh perspectives.The open mind can understand what the ancient esoteric teachings explain: that there are divine beings involved with the creation of species, and they do so through evolution, devolution, natural selection, and other laws, not only physically, but in all the levels and dimensions of nature. Furthermore, the myths of Hyperboreans, Lemurians, Atlanteans, Adam and Eve, etc. are based on real events in history, but not in the way they are interpreted in popular culture. Instead, the reality of our ancient past is far more astonishing, epic, and complex than we ever imagined. Even better, there are techniques that allow us to confirm the facts for ourselves. Gnostic Anthropology invites you to radically re-evaluate popular beliefs and theories about creation, evolution, the origin of humanity, and history, and open your mind to a more expansive view of life.

A History of Food

A History of Food Author Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat
ISBN-10 9781444305142
Year 2009-03-25
Pages 776
Language en
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
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The story of cuisine and the social history of eating is a fascinating one, and Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat covers all its aspects in this classic history. New expanded edition of a classic book, originally published to great critical acclaim from Raymond Blanc, The New York Times, The Sunday Telegraph, The Independent and more Tells the story of man’s relationship with food from earliest times to the present day Includes a new foreword by acclaimed food writer Betty Fussell, a preface by the author, updated bibliography, and a new chapter bringing the story up to date New edition in jacketed hardback, with c.70 illustrations and a new glossy color plate section "Indispensable, and an endlessly fascinating book. The view is staggering. Not a book to digest at one or several sittings. Savor it instead, one small slice at a time, accompanied by a very fine wine." –New York Times "This book is not only impressive for the knowledge it provides, it is unique in its integration of historical anecdotes and factual data. It is a marvellous reference to a great many topics." –Raymond Blanc "Quirky, encyclopaedic, and hugely entertaining. A delight." –Sunday Telegraph "It's the best book when you are looking for very clear but interesting stories. Everything is cross-referenced to an extraordinary degree, which is great because the information given is so complex and interweaving." –The Independent "A History of Food is a monumental work, a prodigious feat of careful scholarship, patient research and attention to detail. Full of astonishing but insufficiently known facts." –Times Higher Education Supplement

Empires of Food

Empires of Food Author Andrew Rimas
ISBN-10 1439110131
Year 2010-06-15
Pages 320
Language en
Publisher Simon and Schuster
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We are what we eat: this aphorism contains a profound truth about civilization, one that has played out on the world historical stage over many millennia of human endeavor. Using the colorful diaries of a sixteenth-century merchant as a narrative guide, Empires of Food vividly chronicles the fate of people and societies for the past twelve thousand years through the foods they grew, hunted, traded, and ate—and gives us fascinating, and devastating, insights into what to expect in years to come. In energetic prose, agricultural expert Evan D. G. Fraser and journalist Andrew Rimas tell gripping stories that capture the flavor of places as disparate as ancient Mesopotamia and imperial Britain, taking us from the first city in the once-thriving Fertile Crescent to today’s overworked breadbaskets and rice bowls in the United States and China, showing just what food has meant to humanity. Cities, culture, art, government, and religion are founded on the creation and exchange of food surpluses, complex societies built by shipping corn and wheat and rice up rivers and into the stewpots of history’s generations. But eventually, inevitably, the crops fail, the fields erode, or the temperature drops, and the center of power shifts. Cultures descend into dark ages of poverty, famine, and war. It happened at the end of the Roman Empire, when slave plantations overworked Europe’s and Egypt’s soil and drained its vigor. It happened to the Mayans, who abandoned their great cities during centuries of drought. It happened in the fourteenth century, when medieval societies crashed in famine and plague, and again in the nineteenth century, when catastrophic colonial schemes plunged half the world into a poverty from which it has never recovered. And today, even though we live in an age of astounding agricultural productivity and genetically modified crops, our food supplies are once again in peril. Empires of Food brilliantly recounts the history of cyclic consumption, but it is also the story of the future; of, for example, how a shrimp boat hauling up an empty net in the Mekong Delta could spark a riot in the Caribbean. It tells what happens when a culture or nation runs out of food—and shows us the face of the world turned hungry. The authors argue that neither local food movements nor free market economists will stave off the next crash, and they propose their own solutions. A fascinating, fresh history told through the prism of the dining table, Empires of Food offers a grand scope and a provocative analysis of the world today, indispensable in this time of global warming and food crises.